WHAT IS TUMBLR WHAT IS LIFE

I may do stuff

Or I might just reblog stuff

:B

markiplier:

diddlydarnitross:

How Mark sees Wade

The truth is a beautiful thing

markiplier:

diddlydarnitross:

How Mark sees Wade

The truth is a beautiful thing

kittydazzlepuff:

Meet The Iplier's!

(via markiplier)

filthyfrankconfessions:

I try and slip Frank references into conversations so I can find out if the people I talk to have the same messed up sense of humor that I do.

rolleypoleycoley:

shorm:

oxfordthecomma:

fidelcashf1ow:

fuckyeah1990s:

Smash Mouth - All Star (played in Mario Paint)

This is the only thing I’m listening to for the rest of the day.

The use of the yoshi sound effect was genius

oh my god the yoshi effect

That. Was. THE GREATEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE.

(via the-sloppy-adventures)

daphneontherun:

historical-nonfiction:

micdotcom:

Whoa, scientists have finally uncovered the identity of Jack the Ripper 

I don’t normally reblog things, but this is simply too interesting to not make a note of! Read more at the Independent or the Mirror

This is so misleading that it is frankly a lie.

First of all, “Scientists” haven’t solved anything except determined the results of a DNA test—matching a still-living descendent of the sister of a mental patient with a 126-year-old semen stain on the shawl of a single woman thought to be killed by the Ripper.

  • The idea that they could have a “100% match” is highly tenuous at best; siblingship is a tricky thing to discover through DNA to begin with, and vastly more so when you take into account that they’re testing the descendent of a sibling. There’s a reason that whenever possible, geneticists prefer to test a parent as well as a sibling, given how many DNA loci are recombined to form a sibling’s DNA. They also “matched” the shawl’s owner’s bloodstain to her “three-times great-granddaughter,” proving again a “100% match.” 
  • The DNA evidence has not been independently verified by any authorities.
  • The shawl itself, the one and only piece of physical evidence, has not been independently verified. It “is thought” to have been part of the case.
  • The lead detective on the case is not a detective. He is a self-proclaimed “armchair detective” and history nut. 
  • He is selling a book about this. It doesn’t take an “armchair detective” to realize that a book about looking for Jack the Ripper’s identity is not going to turn a profit without showing “conclusive proof” that they’ve found the killer. 
  • His only other proof is the fact that Kosminski was recorded as a suspect in the 1800s by the police, who were notedly anti-Semetic (Kosminski was a Polish Jew). 
  • This “study,” if it can even be called that when the information was clearly biased, was reported in the Daily Mail and the Mirror, not exactly shining bastions of journalism. Look for it to be discredited very soon. I’m betting Cracked’s “B.S. News Stories that Fooled Your Facebook Friends” gets there within a week.
  • The apparently brilliant scientist that has pioneered this new DNA matching technology, Dr. Jari Louhelainen, is hardly a standout in his field. He is not decorated, has received no awards or fellowships that I’ve been able to find, and is a professor at a college that has turned out only one notable alumnus in the scientific field, ever (and she is an astrophysicist). 
  • Even if the shawl and its two spots of purported DNA were not obviously of over-inflated importance (and if they could be verified), that is far from saying the mystery of Jack the Ripper is solved. All that would be in today’s courtroom is a single piece of circumstantial evidence for ONE of five serial murders.

IN SUMMATION.

  1. The newspaper that reported this is a tabloid.
  2. The “detective” is an amateur with a book to sell.
  3. The “scientist” is a lecturer at a new university in England that focuses on sports.
  4. The “evidence” is over-hyped and far from conclusive.
  5. The “evidence” only points to Kosminski for ONE murder out of five.

This is not research. This is sensationalism. The mystery of Jack the Ripper is far from solved.

(via thepageofhopes)

samandriel:

Come not between a dragon and his wrath.

Guys I’m not even gonna lie to you but I stared at this photoset and for a moment I was like “it’s weird that they only ever have animated or CGI dragons and they don’t use real ones”

(Source: thorsodinson, via thepageofhopes)

zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

They were still shitty doctors who really didn’t know anything about medicine. One documented Plague Doctor was a fruit vendor before he became hired by the government to be a doctor.

Still, the proto-hazmat-suit is pretty sweet.

(via the-sloppy-adventures)

robotrockers:

I’ve got a friend and they mean a lot to me.

(Source: princegumbutt, via of-tattoos-and-insanity)